Submarine in World War II

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Germany had the largest submarine fleet during World War II. Due to the Treaty of Versailles limiting the surface navy, the rebuilding of the German surface forces had only begun in earnest a year before the outbreak of World War II.

During World War II, the IJN operated the most varied fleet of submarines of any navy; including Kaiten crewed torpedoes, midget submarines (Ko-hyoteki and Kairyu), medium-range submarines, purpose-built supply submarines and long-range fleet submarines. They also had submarines with the highest submerged speeds during World War II (I-201-class submarines) and submarines that could carry multiple aircraft (I-400-class submarine). They were also equipped with one of the most advanced torpedoes of the conflict, the oxygen-propelled Type 95.

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, many of the U.S. Navy's front-line Pacific Fleet surface ships were destroyed or severely damaged. The submarines survived the attack and carried the war to the enemy. Lacking support vessels, the submarines were asked to independently hunt and destroy Japanese ships and submarines. They did so very effectively and without the assistance of other supporting ships.

The Royal Navy Submarine Service was primarily used to enforce the classic British blockade role. It therefore chiefly operated in inshore waters and tended to only surface by night.

Its major operating areas were around Norway, the Mediterranean (against the Axis supply routes to North Africa), and in the Far East. Royal Navy submarines operating out of Trincomalee and Australia were a constant threat to Japanese shipping passing through the Malacca Straits.

List Submarine in World War II:
SubmarinePictureSpecificationsCountryYear
German Type XXIII submarine

Germany1945
I-201 class submarine

Japan1945
Amphion class submarine

UK1945
HMS Meteorite

Germany1945
Type A2 submarine

Japan1944
Type AM submarine

Japan1944
I-400 class submarine

Japan1944
Tench

US1944
German Type XXI submarine

Germany1943
Type C3 submarine

Japan1943
Gato class submarine

Japan1943
Type B1 submarine

Japan1942
Balao

US1942
German Type X submarine

Germany1941
German Type XIV submarine

Germany1941
Type A1 submarine

Japan1941
British U class submarine

UK1941
British V class submarine

UK1941
Marconi class submarine

Italy1940
Type A Ko-hyoteki class submarine

Japan1940
British T class submarine

UK1940
Oruç Reis class submarine

UK1940
Gato

US1940
Soviet K class submarine

Russia1939
Tambor

US1939
Mackerel

US1939
German Type IX submarine

Germany1938
Marcello class submarine

Italy1938
Brin class submarine

Italy1938
Adua class submarine

Italy1937
Sargo

US1937
Kalev class submarine

Estonia1936
German Type I submarine

Germany1936
German Type VII submarine

Germany1936
Foca class submarine

Italy1936
Grampus class submarine

UK1936
Salmon

US1936
German Type II submarine

Germany1935
Glauco class submarine

Italy1935
Pravda class submarine

Russia1935
Vesikko

Finland1934
French submarine Surcouf (N N 3)

France1934
Archimede class submarine

Italy1933
Soviet M class submarine

Russia1933
Porpoise

US1933
Shchuka class submarine

Russia1932
River class submarine

UK1932
Leninets class submarine

Russia1931
Soviet S class submarine

Russia1931
Cachalot

US1931
Saukko

Finland1930
Vetehinen class submarine

Finland1930
Italian submarine Ettore Fieramosca

Italy1930
Orzeł class submarine

Netherlands1930
Rainbow class submarine

UK1930
Dolphin

US1930
Wilk class submarine

Poland1929
Osvetnik class submarine

Yugoslavia1929
Parthian class submarine

UK1929
Dekabrist class submarine

Russia1928
Hrabri class submarine

Yugoslavia1928
Sirène class submarine

France1927
Circé class submarine

France1927
Katsonis class submarine

Greece1927
Balilla class submarine

Italy1927
Odin class submarine

UK1927
Narwhal

US1927
Type J1 submarine

Japan1926
HMS X1

UK1925
Argonaut

US1925
Norwegian B class submarine

Norway1923
Redoutable class submarine (1931)

France1922
AA-1

US1922
S

US1922
Barracuda

US1921
British M class submarine

UK1920


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